Search Results for peter wolf

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Peter Wolf

…nbsp;Travelers promoting this release. Recently, he was also a guest d.j. on Tom Petty’s Sirius XM Radio Show where he played Petty tunes and music from his own legendarily large record collection.   The legacy of Peter Wolf showcases his vibrant passion for music that has motivated him for most of his life and throughout a career that spans blues, soul, country, folk and jazz.   “Do you ever see you and Seth writing songs…


Peter Wolf

…radio. “He had a beautiful understanding of what to do with the radio,” Joe Rogers said of Wolf. “He understood something about show business and how to grab people‘s attention, then what to do with them once you had them.” Peter Wolf didn’t just arrive at the station for his overnight show with a box of records to play, he arrived with a plan. He had a theme song: “Mosaic” by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, plus an entourage including…


The Hallucinations

…tar and Joe Clark on bass. The band performed from 1965 to 1968.(by Ed Symkus) According to an often-repeated story, an early version of The Hallucinations was playing at a party when the singer was too drunk to continue and Peter Wolf, who was at the party, jumped up and took his place. Not so says guitarist Paul Shapiro. “The Hallucinations did not exist at that party. Steven Bladd, Doug Slade and myself were playing at this party in a…


Peter Malick

…rst heard Lee Dorsey singing “Working in a Coal Mine” on WILD, his musical tastes switched from pop to soul and blues. Yet when he started performing in bands – the first one was PPMWW (members were, as the initials suggest, Peter Ivers, Peter Malick, Michael Tschudin, Walter Powers, and Willie Loco Alexander), the second was The Listening – the music fell under the category of psychedelic. The Listening had one album on Vanguard records, did…


Peter Dayton

…and attached a certain grand destiny to its future. Undeterred, Dayton followed his inner voice and formed a solo band that also rocked, but sidestepped the focused metallic drone that characterized his previous effort. The Peter Dayton Band prominently featured keyboards, which would soon become the dominating instrument in a decade of New Wave music. Ric Ocasek became a fan and musical confidant, his stature as the guiding force of The Cars…


A Blues Summit In A VW Bus

…ght was a recent émigré from Belfast then living in Cambridge, Van Morrison. In fact, he played the Tea Party the next weekend, performing material for the album he would record that fall, Astral Weeks. After the show I gave Peter, Van and John Lee a ride to Cambridge, where Peter and I also lived. While I manned the wheel, the three of them sat together on the back bench seat of the Tea Party’s VW bus and carried on an animated conversation….


Peter Malick Listens To The Universe

Peter Malick is a guitarist and record producer from Boston who early in his career played with legendary piano bluesman Otis Spann and lived at his home in Chicago. My entry into the bigtime happened not long after my 14th birthday. The place was a bar on Huntington Ave, and it was my first gig outside of either school, or in a church basement. I was the youngest band member, and I innocently walked up to the big Irish police officer who was…


Peter Rowan

Equally adept at playing guitar and mandolin, and at singing and yodeling, Wayland, MA native Peter Rowan is best known as a local king of bluegrass, since he first joined Bill Monroe and His Bluegrass Boys in the mid-’60s. But he’s been involved with many styles of music, from Tex-Mex with The Cupids to folk-rock with Earth Opera and a mix of blues, jazz, folk, bluegrass and classical in Seatrain. He played full-out bluegrass with his brothers…


Kate Taylor

…band at age fifteen and had her first record deal with Atlantic Records four years later. This debut record, Sister Kate, released in 1971, was produced by Peter Asher, her manager at the time, who had many hits with his duo Peter & Gordon in the ’60’s. Kate: “I met Peter Asher in 1969 when I went to London to visit brother James when he was making, with Peter producing, his album for Apple Records. James and I were invited…


Jim Parry

…‘I’m doing this show at this new station, but I’ve never engineered before and I have no idea how to do that.’ I said, ’Oh, gee, I did that when I was in school.” So, as simply as that, Parry joined the cast of characters on Wolf’s show, manning the controls, pushing buttons and cueing up records. At the end of each night, as dawn closed in, Wolf would launch into a closing rap in which he thanked his cohorts including “Jim Parry – looking…


The Boston Tea Party

…weekend and the next one featured The Lost. In that group, his first band, was Willie “Loco” Alexander, who later became a mainstay of Boston’s punk scene. Then came the Tea Party debut of The Hallucinations, whose frontman Peter Wolf went on to hit records and the cover of Rolling Stone with The J. Geils Band. Soon the film showings ended, and the Tea Party began presenting acts from out of town. The Velvet Underground first came up from New…


Johnny A.

…r Revival drummer Doug Clifford. Then it was on to Delaney & Bonnie and Derek And The Dominos keyboardist Bobby Whitlock’s band before becoming the guitarist and music director for The J. Geils Band front man Peter Wolf. He played on Wolf’s albums and also co- produced one of them (Long Line, 1996 which received four stars from Rolling Stone) as well as joining him on several world tours. In 1999, Johnny A. launched his solo…


Al Perry

Al Perry appeared on the air during the nightly Peter Wolf broadcasts, working the controls for ‘Wooa-Goofa’ during ‘BCN’s formative months in 1968. But he’d actually been at the station for six months by that point, hired when WBCN still featured classical music. “I swept floors; then I got my FCC license and did a little news and weather at the top of the hour. When Ray Riepen came in I started selling [commercial time].” This meant that…


The J. Geils Band

…rt acts in the ’70s and ’80s. Originally The J. Geils Blues Band out of Worcester, MA — including guitarist J. Geils, harmonica player Magic Dick and bassist Danny Klein — in 1968 manic frontman Peter Wolf and his former bandmate in The Hallucinations Stephen Jo Bladd joined up, followed by keyboardist Seth Justman. The group, a stickler for regular practice sessions, played countless gigs in New England bars and at The…


J.J. Jackson

…son held down a computer technology job, but was a novice DJ himself, on WTUF at Tufts. He tuned in 104.1 and was blown away: “I really flipped out over it,” Jackson told Record World in June 1978. “I went up to visit Peter [Wolf] while he was on the air, and I just fell in love with the station and everyone I met.” “I knew JJ Jackson to be a 300-pound R & B singer,” Wolf recalled. “So he called me. I said, ‘Come on by.’ I opened the door…


WBCN

…ater bed stores clamored so much to run their commercials on ‘BCN’s airwaves that by May Tchaikovsky got the news and rock programming went 24/7. The first DJs operated out of studios at 171 Newbury Street and included Peter Wolf in his pre-stardom days, Jim Parry, Al Perry, Tommy Hadges, Sam Kopper and Steve Segal. Soon the station moved across town to Stuart Street with JJ Jackson and Charles Laquidara joining the circle. Except for Wolf’s…


Opening for The J. Geils Band at Boston Garden

…record deal, no booking agent deal and no clout we couldn’t believe our good fortune. The first show was at Cobo Arena on 1/28/82 in Detroit and I was scared knobless. We were set to go on promptly at 7:15pm and Peter Wolf came into our dressing room prior and offered some advice; ‘ hit ’em hard, hit ’em fast and don’t falter !’. We took that advice to heart, by the end of that Cobo Arena show we knew that…


Charlie McKenzie

…The late Boston lead singer Brad Delp was quoted in a Boston Globe story: “Charlie was the first person to hear something in the tapes we sent out. We’ll always be grateful to him for that.” The great Peter Wolf of the J. Geils Band called Charlie a “true rock n’ roll character” and has said he always asked Charlie to listen to J. Geils Band songs before they were released due to Charlie’s amazing ears…


Bunratty’s/Melody Lounge/Local 186/The Wonder Bar

…ylor (oldest brother of James) in Alex Taylor, James Montgomery and The Funkbusters. James Montgomery (Johnny Winter) in The Funkbusters and The James Montgomery Band.    PEOPLE YOU MIGHT HAVE SEEN IN THE AUDIENCE: Peter Wolf (The J.Geils Band) who once almost had his car towed away while watching a band inside. Jimmy Miller, producer extraordinaire of The Rolling Stones, Motor Head, Blind Faith, Jethro Tull and many others. Bob…


The Unicorn Coffee House

…rrison, Jefferson Airplane, The Chambers Brothers, Gram Parson’s International Submarine Band, The Velvet Underground and, before they became TV stars, The Monkees. And it hosted local groups such as the J.Geils Band (before Peter Wolf joined the group), Colwell-Winfield Blues Band, The Modern Lovers, Ultimate Spinach and Orpheus, who were discovered there and signed to a record deal. For a while WBZ’s great DJ Dick Summer did a weekly MC gig at…


Bobby Chouinard

…ity nightclub scene, where his powerhouse drumming style fueled late ’70s rock ‘n’ rollers Robert Gordon and Chris Spedding. Chouinard spent the Eighties working with everyone from Billy Squier, Ted Nugent, Peter Wolf, and Cher, and drummed on Alice Cooper’s 1989 hit album, Trash; Chouinard’s raw energy and pure attack led Cooper to call him one of the best musicians he ever worked with. Chouinard passed away in…


The Short, Beautiful Life of The Performance Center

Peter Wassyng has spent a life surrounded by music. In addition to his work below, he had a long career as a record promo man for Capitol Records, EMI-America and A&M Records, among others. My lifelong journey in the music industry began in earnest when I helped Roger Abramson manage The Performance Center, a small two-room club on the third floor of The Garage in Harvard Square at 36 Boylston Street (now JFK Street). Although the club only…


Amphion

…#78 on the national Billboard charts. Drummer Rick Schlosser became a studio musician in L.A. and has worked with many top recording artists. In 1968, Amphion was representing the J. Geils Blues Band when they added frontman Peter Wolf and drummer Stephen Jo Bladd from The Hallucinations. Ray insisted that the group keep its name, that of its guitarist. The band eventually left Amphion but became a huge success as The J. Geils Band, with several…


Charles Laquidara

…ioned for the lead role in The Boston Strangler, but as an unknown, lost that part to Tony Curtis (an event Laquidara would rue on the air for his entire career). But his timing at WBCN was perfect: he replaced the departing Peter Wolf just as the station moved into its second home on Stuart Street. Laquidara revealed, “With the advent of underground radio, there was a place for a guy who was simply – real. He didn’t have to have a deep…


Wendy Carlos

…0s to develop Digi-Surround Stereo Sound, a digital process for soundtrack restoration and surround stereo conversion. There was also a rather unexpected collaboration with “Weird” Al Yankovic: a spoof of Sergei Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf.” Carlos then spent five years digitally remastering her entire catalog. Her most recent release was 2005’s two-volume Rediscovering Lost Scores, which featured previously out-of-print material and…


Long View Farm Studio

…lown in from New York City. Boston’s J. Geils Band recorded all four of their EMI albums starting with Sanctuary in 1977 through Freeze Frame and You’re Gettin’ Even While I’m Gettin’ Odd, which was recorded without frontman Peter Wolf. Aerosmith recorded “Chip Away the Stone” in June 1978 and returned in the 1990s for pre-production of Get a Grip and later drum recordings for Nine Lives and Just Push Play. The Pat Metheny Group recorded…


James Montgomery

The blues singer/harpist has been dubbed “The John Mayall of New England” by no less an authority than Peter Wolf. Montgomery has been a Bay State blues machine since 1970, when he formed his first band while a student at Boston University. He’s recorded half a dozen albums on his own — including 1973’s First Time Out and ’74’s High Roller — and recorded with the likes of Gregg Allman and Kid Rock. When he’s not…


Face to Face

…ular, has been a mainstay on the local scene (often working with the Twinemen). Kimball has recorded with Bruce Springsteen, Carly Simon, Debbie Harry and many others. He recorded, produced, and toured for several years with Peter Wolf most recently on the critically-acclaimed 2002 LP Sleepless. Since 2004 he has been a member of Bob Dylan’s constantly touring caravan, recording with Dylan on Modern Times. Two of Face to Face’s three discs are…


The Boston Sound

…al bands like Phluph, Ill Wind, and Eden’s Children, who had developed a following, and who played music in the style of the psychedelic groups.  One band that Uncle T liked was the Hallucinations, featuring lead singer Peter Wolf (later of the J. Geils Band). But the Boston music scene was not easy to categorize, since not all the popular bands fit into the psychedelic genre.  For example, The Bagatelle was an eight-piece band whose…


Van Morrison

…rs Them (“Gloria”) in 1966 and had a pop hit with “Brown-Eyed Girl,” Morrison moved from Belfast to Cambridge, MA, basically broke and wondering what to do next. He was befriended by J. Geils frontman Peter Wolf and readily accepted by the local music community. Given time to think and breathe after the hectic start of his career, Morrison began working on music totally different from his previous efforts and first…


Exploring The Catacombs With Van Morrison

…ad played. The Catacombs was no different. People like Richie Haven and Tom Rush played there, as well as Blues Project. The famous jam session with the Doors and Universal Underpass took place there. Local celebrities, like Peter Wolf from the J. Geils band, were in the audience that night.   There was an old tapestry behind the stage, and a small dressing room behind the curtain. Van sequestered himself back there just before the set to…


The Woodrose Ballroom

…, John Boyd (“Captain Video”), formerly of The Road light show at the Tea Party, and John’s wife Barbara (“Auntie Gravity”).  The opening weekend on March 14-15 featured Tea Party homeboys The J. Geils Blues Band.  Peter Wolf later sang of their eating at a local joint before a show at the Woodrose and then crashing there afterwards (“Ate in the Four Winds Diner / Slept in the Woodrose Hall”), in the band’s classic cut “Hard Drivin’…


Grabbing the Horn by the Bulls at Boston Garden

…everything that was passing through Boston and the region. Youth is a beautiful thing, and I was fortunate to be in a blossoming environment where Bonnie Raitt, J Geils, Aerosmith, Boston, Spider John Koerner, Reeve Little, Peter Bell, James Montgomery, Peter Johnson, Robin Lane and so many more were hanging out in the midst of the best period I can remember. Boston was rocking. Because of my association with Don, I used to witness some surreal…


La Peste

…name (translated as “The Plague”) from the book by Albert Camus. La Peste’s appearance on the Boston scene at the tail end of the 70’s was sudden and striking. Fronted by the tall, dark, and handsome Peter Dayton, the band blasted out of its rehearsal hall/apartment and quickly made a mark in the local circuit, winning a high-visibility 1978 Battle of the Bands at the Inman Square Men’s Bar in Cambridge, releasing a…


B.B. King, his B.B. ring, and B.B.

…b 47 in Cambridge, which for several years had presented a who’s who of the blues. I was there for many of those shows. So when I became the manager of the Tea Party, I booked electric blues greats like Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and John Lee Hooker, as well as many American and British blues rock bands influenced by them. That night B.B. King wore a gold ring on his left hand with B.B. spelled out back-to-back in diamonds. During his set the…


Dale Dorman

…hts at first, and readily admitting that he was horrible when he first started out; but with Dale’s sense of humor, impeccable timing, and of course that wit, it didn’t take him long to get better at his craft. He worked for WOLF in Syracuse and KFRC in San Francisco for two years when station management suggested to Dale that he do mornings; and in August of 1968 he landed the gig at WRKO and the legend of “Uncle Dale” was born in Boston. Over…


15 Lansdowne Street

…iddley, Fleetwood Mac, Buddy Guy, Jethro Tull, Elton John, B.B. King, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Little Richard, Van Morrison, Rick Nelson, Procol Harum, Tom Rush, Santana, Rod Stewart, The Velvet Underground, The Who, Howlin’ Wolf, Neil Young, Frank Zappa and, in several appearances, Boston’s own J. Geils Band. But even the Tea Party was not immune to the economics of the music business; as acts grew in popularity, so did the cost of hiring them….


The Proletariat

“People are always telling us to smile onstage,” said Peter Bevilacqua, bassist for the Proletariat. “But we’re serious. We believe so much in what we’re doing.” Why smile when it’s more fun to sneer? Dogmatic lyrics, belligerent vocals, shadowy, guitar-dominated soundscapes, a heavy de-emphasis on image—Fall River (MA)’s the Proletariat occupied that exhilarating, cramped space between punk and post-punk. Deranged with frustration and…


Tone-Cool Records

…he 2011 Blues Music Awards, held by the Blues Foundation in Memphis. Out of all the blues labels in the world Vizztone got three out of the five nominations for ‘Best New Artist Debut’– Chris O’Leary, Peter Parcek and eventual winner Matt Hill. Since their founding they have released more than eighty albums from artists including Debbie Davies, David Maxwell, Louisiana Red, Trampled Underfoot, Sean Costello, Erin Harpe…


Lyres

…numerous singles and EPs, including such hits as “Buried Alive”, “Help You Ann”, and “Don’t Tell Me Lies”, the lineup of Lyres has changed over time with Jeff and drummer Paul Murphy as constants. (Of note, former guitarist Peter Greenburg left Lyres in 1983 and went on to form Barrence Whitfield and the Savages.) The band made a brief move to Los Angeles in 1989, only to relocate back to Boston the following year. Lyres remain Boston’s own and…


Tom Hambridge

…rdinaire. During this time, whenever Chuck Berry or Roy Buchanan came to town for a performance,  he would get the call and become their band leader/drummer. He also performed with super stars Bo Diddley, Martha Reeves, Peter Noone and a ton of others. For more than a decade, his band T.H. & The Wreckage played throughout New England and established a large following. They recorded three albums and won five Boston Music Awards….


Newport Folk Festival: A Triptych

…f rock with Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly, Elvis, and multitudes of other talented rock artists.  In the early part of the decade, we became enamored with folk music.  The easy sounds of Tom Rush, the Kingston Trio, and Peter, Paul, and Mary gave our parents a little break, although Bob Dylan and Joan Baez were always available to drive them over the edge to insanity.  According to them, Dylan couldn’t sing and Baez was just…


Canobie Ballroom Record Hops

…what remains of the group to this day. Then came the British Invasion, and that summer several groups from across the pond played at Canobie. The first was the Searchers (“ Needles and Pins” ), followed by Herman’ s Hermits, Peter and Gordon, and The Yardbirds (with Jimmy Page). By this time the original dress code had vansished, and people were showing up in bell-bottom pants and paisley shirts. Another era had begun. The final days of the…


The Pandoras

…replaced by drummer Nanci DiMuro; Keehner left and was replaced by guitarist Michelle Marquis. Much later, Thierry split and was replaced by bassist Kelly Gifford. In the middle of all that, under the management guidance of Peter Bonfils and the booking expertise of David LaCamera, the band had some success, including a recording contract and a couple of singles with Liberty Records (“About My Baby”, b/w “New Day,”…


Pousette-Dart Band

…. During this time, the Pousette-Dart Band became one of the busiest touring groups in the U.S., working with fellow travelers like the Byrds, Bonnie Raitt, Little Feat, James Taylor, Yes, the The J. Geils Band, Eddie Money, Peter Frampton, Journey and Billy Joel. In 1973, he formed the Pousette-Dart Band with John Troy, his college mate from the University of Pacific, and a new recruit, John Curtis. Initially conceived as a string band, the…


The Fools

…2; released after the group signed with EMI. After a couple of albums, they broke from the label and went independent, putting out the 1985 album World Dance Party, which had the strange hit “Life Sucks… Then You Die.” The band parted ways in the mid-1990s but is now back together, still doing spot gigs, in 2007. Their best cover recording remains the Peter Pan ditty “I Won’t Grow Up.” (by Ed Symkus)…


Extreme

First called The Dreams, the Bay State band’s original 1981 lineup was Gary Cherone, Paul Geary, Eddy Goulart and Peter Hunt. By their first recording in 1984, Goulart had been replaced by David Rich, and they were known for energetic stage shows. For mystery-shrouded reasons, the band lost their name, and by 1985 they were the “ex-Dream,” which morphed into Extreme. Another lineup change resulted in Pat Badger and Nuno…


Big Dipper

After parting ways with Peter Prescott and his post-Mission of Burma project Volcano Suns two years before that group released their 1987 debut The Bright Orange Years, guitarist Gary Waleik and bassist Steve Michener (who also served in fellow-Bostonians Dumptruck) recruited guitarist/vocalist Bill Goffrier, and drummer Jeff Oliphant to form Big Dipper. Mixing post-punk jaggedness with Amerindie jangle, the band gigged regularly throughout…


Earth Opera

…d Earth Opera once had a good shot at being the East Coast answer to the Grateful Dead. It never happened, but it’s easy to understand such enthusiasm. The band’s core members featured singer/songwriter/guitarist Peter Rowan and mandolin virtuoso David Grisman, and also included John Nagy on bass, Paul Dillon on drums, and Bill Stevenson on keyboards. The group’s sound leaned more towards the new psychedelic movement than the…


James Taylor

…ched to guitar and eventually started writing songs, after being raised in North Carolina, where his father was a college dean. Taylor did a stint in the band The Flying Machine before sending a demo tape to British producer Peter Asher in 1968. That resulted in his being signed to Apple Records and his first self-titled album, which featured exquisite singing, playing and arrangements. But Taylor hit his stride with his triple platinum 1970…


Barrence Whitfield

…sey in the late ’70s to attend Boston University after fronting hard rock, disco, and even progressive rock bands. But he never sang any soul or R&B music until he met Boston musicians, including ex-Lyres guitarist Peter Greenberg, who shared Whitfield’s love of high energy soul and R&B music performed by artists like Screamin’ Jay Hawkins and Little Richard. In 1983, Barrence Whitfield & the Savages were born. The band,…


Ric Ocasek

…table for the massive and lasting success of the Cars beginning in 1978. Most laudably, Ocasek used his new-found fame and clout to aid and abet the Boston music scene, producing and playing on releases by the New Models and Peter Dayton as well as national efforts from San Francisco’s Romeo Void, Alan Vega and Martin Rev of Suicide, and singer Bebe Buell. His 1982 solo album Beatitude, which reached #28 on the national sales charts, also…


What’s the best concert you ever saw? Tommy Can You Hear Me?

…ssion we heard 1921, Amazing Journey, Sparks and then my favorite the Sonny Boy Williamson song, Eyesight to the Blind. I could hear, feel and even taste the music. By now, everyone was on their feet. The crowd went crazy as Peter played the stage, performing his classic windmill antics. Entwistle played bass. Later he would die from a cocaine overdose. Keith, the crazy man, flung his sticks into the air. He would be one of the first to die,…


The Dogmatics

After a short stint in the late 1970s with the South Shore band the Savage Beasties, Dorchester native Paul O’Halloran got together with his brother Peter and their pal Jerry Lehane, and another friend, Dan Shannon, to form the Dogmatics — a crude, raucous punk band that played their first show at Cantones in 1981, and would regularly take the stage at The Rat and TT the Bears, performing originals such as “Teenagers on…


Mission of Burma

The post-punkers Mission of Burma — originally the trio of Roger Miller (guitar), Clint Conley (bass), and Peter Prescott (drums), then a quartet with Martin Swope (“tape manipulator”, etc.) — had a great four-year run from 1979-83, highlighted by trenchant tracks such as “That’s When I Reach For My Revolver” and “Academy Fight Song”. The band recorded one EP (1981’s Signals, Calls and…


DMZ

…nd Eddie (the Turtles’ Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan) and emerged with the long-player DMZ in 1978. Although songs like “Mighty Idy” and “Out of Our Tree” found local favor, there simply wasn’t much of a market yet for thunderous pop-oriented rock and roll, so the album disappeared and the group blew apart before the end of the year. Monoman went on to front the vastly influential sixties-roots band the Lyres while guitarist Peter


Monoman + Oil Truck = Mission of Burma?

…reen velvet frockcoat. There was a bit of confusion. He thought he was auditioning for bass. But he was game for trying guitar too. He said he was from Ann Arbor and his name was Roger Miller. He played some startling whole-tone solos, and said he wrote music too. The song he showed us that night was called, “Max Ernst.” I felt my life changing again. Editor’s note: Clint Conley, Roger Miller, and Peter Prescott formed Mission of Burma in…